Is Instone Real Estate Group (ETR:INS) Using Too Much Debt?

Simply Wall St · 09/15/2023 04:36

David Iben put it well when he said, 'Volatility is not a risk we care about. What we care about is avoiding the permanent loss of capital.' So it might be obvious that you need to consider debt, when you think about how risky any given stock is, because too much debt can sink a company. As with many other companies Instone Real Estate Group SE (ETR:INS) makes use of debt. But the real question is whether this debt is making the company risky.

When Is Debt A Problem?

Debt assists a business until the business has trouble paying it off, either with new capital or with free cash flow. In the worst case scenario, a company can go bankrupt if it cannot pay its creditors. However, a more frequent (but still costly) occurrence is where a company must issue shares at bargain-basement prices, permanently diluting shareholders, just to shore up its balance sheet. Of course, plenty of companies use debt to fund growth, without any negative consequences. When we examine debt levels, we first consider both cash and debt levels, together.

Check out our latest analysis for Instone Real Estate Group

How Much Debt Does Instone Real Estate Group Carry?

You can click the graphic below for the historical numbers, but it shows that as of June 2023 Instone Real Estate Group had €589.9m of debt, an increase on €500.5m, over one year. However, because it has a cash reserve of €296.4m, its net debt is less, at about €293.4m.

debt-equity-history-analysis
XTRA:INS Debt to Equity History September 15th 2023

A Look At Instone Real Estate Group's Liabilities

According to the last reported balance sheet, Instone Real Estate Group had liabilities of €816.5m due within 12 months, and liabilities of €426.0m due beyond 12 months. Offsetting these obligations, it had cash of €296.4m as well as receivables valued at €404.7m due within 12 months. So it has liabilities totalling €541.3m more than its cash and near-term receivables, combined.

This deficit casts a shadow over the €274.8m company, like a colossus towering over mere mortals. So we definitely think shareholders need to watch this one closely. After all, Instone Real Estate Group would likely require a major re-capitalisation if it had to pay its creditors today.

We measure a company's debt load relative to its earnings power by looking at its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and by calculating how easily its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) cover its interest expense (interest cover). This way, we consider both the absolute quantum of the debt, as well as the interest rates paid on it.

Instone Real Estate Group's debt is 3.8 times its EBITDA, and its EBIT cover its interest expense 2.9 times over. This suggests that while the debt levels are significant, we'd stop short of calling them problematic. Even worse, Instone Real Estate Group saw its EBIT tank 37% over the last 12 months. If earnings keep going like that over the long term, it has a snowball's chance in hell of paying off that debt. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. But it is future earnings, more than anything, that will determine Instone Real Estate Group's ability to maintain a healthy balance sheet going forward. So if you want to see what the professionals think, you might find this free report on analyst profit forecasts to be interesting.

Finally, a business needs free cash flow to pay off debt; accounting profits just don't cut it. So the logical step is to look at the proportion of that EBIT that is matched by actual free cash flow. Over the last three years, Instone Real Estate Group recorded free cash flow worth a fulsome 81% of its EBIT, which is stronger than we'd usually expect. That puts it in a very strong position to pay down debt.

Our View

To be frank both Instone Real Estate Group's EBIT growth rate and its track record of staying on top of its total liabilities make us rather uncomfortable with its debt levels. But at least it's pretty decent at converting EBIT to free cash flow; that's encouraging. Overall, it seems to us that Instone Real Estate Group's balance sheet is really quite a risk to the business. For this reason we're pretty cautious about the stock, and we think shareholders should keep a close eye on its liquidity. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. For instance, we've identified 3 warning signs for Instone Real Estate Group (1 makes us a bit uncomfortable) you should be aware of.

If, after all that, you're more interested in a fast growing company with a rock-solid balance sheet, then check out our list of net cash growth stocks without delay.